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Strategic Plan


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Background

The Delaware Division of the Arts partnered with the Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement to develop a new strategic plan for 2021–2025 that identifies and incorporates the ideas, issues and initiatives of Delaware’s arts community including its artists, organizations, audiences and educators.

Cultivating Creativity: 2021-2025 reinforces and recognizes the value of the arts as it relates to economic prosperity, education, strong communities, and individual health and wellbeing.

A primary focus in this planning process has been to identify ways in which the Division can better serve and elevate the arts sector in an equitable manner to cultivate expanded diversity and inclusion in programming, access, and allocation of resources.

The plan was formally adopted by the Delaware State Arts Council at their June 2021 meeting, for implementation beginning July 1, 2021. Download a PDF of the Plan and the Appendix here:


Cultivating Creativity: 2021-2025

Dear Friends,

The Delaware Division of the Arts and Delaware State Arts Council are pleased to present our strategic plan for 2021–2025. Having gathered input from more than 400 participants statewide, this plan represents the goals and aspirations of the people we serve.

We endeavored in this process to reach out to communities and individuals we have not heard from in the past. Our focus in this process, and for the strategic plan, is to expand our reach, impacting new communities and historically marginalized populations.

To that end, we are committed to supporting the arts and cultivating creativity to enhance the quality of life in Delaware, while upholding a core set of values, including artistic merit, diversity, equity, inclusion, and innovation.

The Division seeks to strengthen the arts sector to serve all of Delaware’s communities; enhance the promotion of Delaware’s arts resources; ensure access to quality arts education for PreK-12 youth; and advance community development and public engagement through the arts.

Our goal was to craft a strategic plan that is clear, comprehensive, and flexible. To correspond with the strategic plan, the Division and Council will annually develop an operational plan corresponding to the fiscal year that integrates specific action steps, evaluative measures, and timelines with the outcomes and strategies in the plan.

The rationale behind this approach is simple: to keep the Division focused on the long-term outcomes and strategies of the plan, while developing operational plans that recognize the realities of a changing environment and variable resources over the short term.

We are grateful to all those who provided input in the shaping of this plan. We invite you to share in our work and let us know how we can better serve Delaware in support of the arts.

Sincerely,

Paul Weagraff, Director, Delaware Division of the Arts
Joseph Mack Wathen, Chair, Delaware State Arts Council

The work on the Delaware Division of the Arts 2021–2025 Strategic Plan began in September 2020, six months after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Arts organizations and artists were greatly impacted by mandated health and safety guidelines, and in Delaware (as elsewhere) there were heightened concerns centered on racial equity and social justice. Recognizing the significance of the moment, the Division chose to incorporate broad and diverse input on our work, seeking to understand the state of the state’s arts organizations, artists, arts educators, and the art economy. An in-depth process consisting of 30 individual interviews, ten focus groups, three virtual town halls, four online surveys, and myriad email comments allowed over 400 individuals to provide the insights that created this plan. All work was conducted using social distancing measures, and input included both those who had received Division grants and those who engage with the arts but had no prior experience with the Division.

Participants shared how they value the arts, recognizing it as a vital component of a thriving economy, with awareness that the arts provide job skills; bring people together; and create physical, spiritual, and emotional wellness. Results indicated satisfaction with the Division’s grantmaking and programs, and the staff received high marks for responsiveness and communication skills. However, there was a perception that the Division concentrates its grantmaking in more traditional art forms, and many individuals called for an expanded funding strategy embracing non-traditional art forms that engage with more racially and culturally diverse artists.

COVID-19 has had a dramatic and adverse effect on the creative sector. According to Brookings Institution estimates, over one-third of Delaware’s creative jobs were lost in the first three months of the pandemic. Arts organizations participating in the survey estimated a 57% drop in 2020 audiences. The arts are a critical component of the state’s economic strength, and surveys reflected how the state’s businesses, arts organizations, government, schools, and artists rely on one another. School-age youth were of great concern. Access to arts programming outside of school is sparse in certain areas of the state, and inconsistent internet access means that youth engagement in school-based arts has been curtailed. However, many Delaware arts organizations found creative ways to engage youth in their homes, ranging from the creation of community arts projects to home delivery of art supplies.

During the course of planning outreach, the Division consistently received feedback on opportunities that would improve access to the arts and to arts funding for both artists of color and art forms reflecting differing cultural heritage. Arts organizations are interested in receiving support that would enable them to diversify leadership and explore ways to improve accessibility and arts engagement with diverse audiences. In addition to funding more diverse art forms, artists would like the Division to provide support for skill-building in business practices, as well as outreach that would connect them to artist peers. There is recognition that some parts of Delaware do not have ready access to local arts venues, and respondents indicated a desire for the Division to explore state-wide opportunities to benefit these regions. Finally, there is a desire to see an increase in funding through possible government and private sector partnerships that would boost investment in the arts.

Based on these findings, staff and a designated working group revised the Division’s Mission, Vision, and Values, identifying desired outcomes and strategies for 2021-2025. In partnership with other government agencies and the Delaware Arts Alliance, over the next four years the Division will seek to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Quality arts experiences for all
  • A healthy arts ecosystem where artists are supported and connected, and arts organizations are financially sustainable
  • Artists, arts organization staff, and arts programming reflect the diversity of our communities
  • Division grants and services are recognized statewide by all, particularly by artists, organizations, and community leaders

This strategic plan presents outcomes and strategies that will guide the Division in its grants, programs, and services over a four-year period. The Division intentionally developed a streamlined framework that can endure economic and political fluctuations, with the intent of constructing annual goal-oriented operational plans and performance indicators that align with the strategic plan and respond to current conditions. Those operational plans will be available on the Division’s website at https://arts.delaware.gov/strategic-plan.

Additional background information on the planning process, including detailed input from interviews, focus groups, town halls, and public comments can be accessed in the strategic plan’s appendix at: https://artsfiles.delaware.gov/DDOA_2021-2025_Strategic_Plan_Appendix.pdf.

ABOUT THE DIVISION OF THE ARTS

The Delaware Division of the Arts, a branch of the Delaware Department of State, is committed to supporting the arts and cultivating creativity to enhance the quality of life in Delaware. Together with its advisory body, the Delaware State Arts Council, the Division administers grants and programs that support arts programming, educate the public, increase awareness of the arts, and integrate the arts into all facets of Delaware life. The Division of the Arts was created by the Delaware General Assembly in 1989.

DELAWARE DIVISION OF THE ARTS STAFF

Paul Weagraff, Director
Kristin Pleasanton, Deputy Director
Kaitlin Ammon, Marketing/Communications
Kathleen Dinsmore, Organization Support
Sheila Dean Ross, Arts Education and Accessibility
Roxanne Stanulis, Artist Programs and Services
Dana Wise, Office Manager and Council Logistics/Correspondence

ABOUT THE DELAWARE STATE ARTS COUNCIL

The Delaware State Arts Council advises the Division of the Arts on matters of arts policy, funding for the arts, and other issues relevant to support for the arts in Delaware. The Council, according to its enabling legislation, “shall be composed of not more than 15 members” appointed by the Governor, who represent the state geographically and politically and are appointed on the basis of their interest and experience in the arts.  The Council is composed of individuals from across the state with diverse backgrounds and expertise including artistic disciplines, organizational management, finance, marketing, education, and community leadership. For details on the Delaware State Arts Council roles and responsibilities, visit https://arts.delaware.gov.

DELAWARE STATE ARTS COUNCIL MEMBERS     

Mack Wathen, Hockessin (Chair)
David Fleming, Wilmington
Christopher C. Moore, Wilmington
Madeleine Bayard, Wilmington
Andrew F. Horgan, Wilmington
John T. Muller, Dover
Jacalyn Beam, Greenville
Janis L. Julian, Wilmington
Cheryle Pringle, Newark
Tina Betz, Wilmington
Michael Kalmbach, Newark
Rosetta Roach, Magnolia
Donna Blakey, Dover
Mary Ann C. Miller, Wilmington
Daniel Shelton, Newark

DELAWARE DIVISION OF THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Arts Summit (Biennial)
Delaware Artist Roster
Delaware State of the Arts Podcasts
Delaware State Employee Art Exhibition (Annual)
DelawareScene.com
Governor’s Awards for the Arts
Grants: Individual Artists, Arts Organizations, Schools, and Community-Based Organizations
Meet the Artist Videos
Mezzanine Gallery
Delaware Poet Laureate
Poetry Out Loud
Poetry and Prose Writers Retreat (Biennial)
Publications, Research, and Resources
StartUp Program for Emerging Arts Organizations
Technical Assistance and Resource Referral
Workshops and Professional Development

DELAWARE DIVISION OF THE ARTS PARTNERSHIPS                         

Americans for the Arts

Building recognition and support for the extraordinary and dynamic value of the arts and leading, serving, and advancing the diverse networks of organizations and individuals who cultivate the arts in America

Arts Center/Gallery, Delaware State University

Hosting the annual Scholastics Visual and Literary Exhibition and Awards and the annual State Employee Art Exhibition

Biggs Museum of American Art

Hosting the annual Individual Artist Fellowship exhibition and reception for the Division

Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement

Strengthening, enhancing, and advancing nonprofits and the sector in Delaware through advocacy, training, capacity building, and research

Delaware Arts Alliance

Advocating for the central role of the arts and arts education in advancing dynamic communities and a creative citizenry

Delaware Division of Libraries

Funding for a statewide Summer Reading Program supporting arts programming at 33 libraries

Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation

Funding for statewide Arts in the Parks programming with emphasis on traditional and folk-art forms

Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation

Supporting regional arts touring and presenters’ initiatives

National Arts Program

Empowering organizations across the country to host art exhibitions that showcase the creativity of their employees and families. NAP partners with the Division to feature the artwork of state employees and their families.

National Assembly of State Arts Agencies

Sharing best practices, information, and research

National Endowment for the Arts

Funding and promoting artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities

National League of American Pen Women: Diamond State Branch

Funding Delaware’s literary program in the National Scholastic Art & Writing Awards serving 450+ middle and high school students annually

NewsRadio 1450 WILM

Sponsoring Delaware State of the Arts, a weekly radio broadcast and podcast featuring Delaware artists, arts organizations, and issues

MISSION

The Delaware Division of the Arts is a state agency committed to supporting the arts and cultivating creativity to enhance the quality of life in Delaware.

VISION

We envision a future where every person and community in Delaware has access to, and appreciation for, the diversity, richness, and transformative power of the arts.

CORE VALUES

  • Artistic Merit: Demonstrate the quality and impact of the arts
  • Diversity: Recognize and include the many dimensions of human identity and difference
  • Equity: Identify and eliminate barriers to participation in the arts through policy and practice
  • Inclusion: Engage a diversity of individuals, communities, and perspectives to ensure equal access, representation, and belonging
  • Innovation: Support new methods, ideas, and practices in artistic creation, programming, governance, and management

OUTCOME 1: Quality arts education experiences for all

 The Division will:

  • Improve access to arts education experiences through focused funding initiatives
  • Encourage exposure to diversified arts experiences (in and out of school)
  • Engage higher education to enhance professional development opportunities for teaching artists and arts educators
  • Increase the number of schools to apply for and receive Artist Residencies and Education Resource grants
  • Collect data to confirm arts education resources are aligning with art experience needs

This Outcome will be evidenced by increased availability of arts education experiences for school-age youth, higher education students, and life-long learners; greater out-of-school collaboration with schools and nonprofits providing arts programming; schools reporting an ample supply of arts educators from higher education institutions; employer access to a workforce with the necessary artistic and creative skills to fill open positions; and expanded opportunities for life-long learning.

 OUTCOME 2: A healthy arts ecosystem where artists are supported and connected, and arts organizations are financially sustainable

The Division will:

  • Evaluate and revise the Division’s grantmaking process to create equitable opportunities for funding across the spectrum of arts organizations and presenters
  • Enhance artists’ career-building skills by facilitating artist connections and providing training opportunities
  • Partner with Delaware Arts Alliance and other community groups to encourage greater participation and investment in the arts in Delaware by government, businesses, foundations, and individuals
  • Encourage greater collaboration among arts organizations and artists statewide
  • Expand partnerships with local municipalities to increase creative placemaking activities

OUTCOME 3       Artists, arts organization staff, and arts programming reflect the diversity of our communities

The Division will:

  • Identify new grant opportunities that encourage artistic expression and access to art forms that celebrate diverse cultures, including folk, contemporary, and traditional arts
  • Provide funding and training for arts organizations to improve accessibility for individuals with disabilities
  • Support art experiences for life-long learners, older adults, and veterans
  • Invest in practices to build capacity, diversity, and inclusion in arts organizations

This Outcome will be evidenced by greater diversity among arts organization board members, staff, and artists; increased public awareness of and access to culturally diverse art forms; funding allocations reflecting community innovation and activities; and expanded geographic reach of funded programming.

OUTCOME 4       Division grants and services are recognized statewide by all, particularly by artists, organizations, and community leaders

The Division will:

  • Expand outreach to encourage BIPOC artists and arts organization leaders to engage with the Division’s programs and grant opportunities
  • Build awareness of, and support for, new and diverse modes of creative expression through the arts
  • Increase Division participation in local community events
  • Launch a public awareness campaign focused on Division programs, resources, and services

This Outcome will be evidenced by more requests for Division funding by new artists and organizations (both arts and community-based) and greater public awareness of the Division’s grantmaking, services, and expertise, including DelawareScene.com.

This Outcome will be evidenced by Delaware’s recognition as an arts destination; artists who are connected to one another and to resources, training, and opportunities to enhance their work; an increase in arts endowment funds; recognition by government and businesses of arts and culture as a catalyst for thriving communities and economies; representation “at the table” when community investment is considered; and greater business engagement with the arts through volunteerism and financial support.

PLAN DEVELOPMENT                    

The Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement (DANA) was contracted to conduct research and facilitate plan development. The Delaware State Arts Council (DSAC) provided guidance on the Division’s revised Mission, Vision, and Value Statement and reviewed the final plan (March 2021) after public comments were gathered. Throughout the process, a working group of Division staff and representatives from the Council was led by Dierdre Montgomery, arts consultant specialist in diversity, equity, and inclusion.

PUBLIC INPUT PROCESS

Community input was gathered via multiple channels, with intentional outreach to communities and artists that have not previously engaged with the Division. Over 400 individuals provided feedback to the Division in a process that consisted of:

  • September & October 2020: Thirty 45-minute interviews engaging representatives of business; government; philanthropy; nonprofit and for-profit arts and social organizations; patrons; donors; artists; and arts educators across the state.
  • October 2020: Ten virtual focus groups via Zoom, each representing a different constituency across all three Delaware counties. They included practicing artists; both volunteer and professionally staffed nonprofit arts organizations; non-arts community-based organizations that provide arts programming; school-based educators; and patrons and donors.
  • November 2020: Three 90-minute virtual town halls – open public forums – to elicit feedback from a wide range of Delaware citizens.
  • December 2020: Four online surveys seeking input from artists, arts educators, business leaders, and leaders from nonprofit institutions (arts and others).
  • January 2021: Two-week public comment period soliciting general input on a draft plan for final reviewing and editing.
  • March 2021: Delaware State Arts Council approves draft strategic plan and recommends copy editing and creation of complementary appendix providing background information
  • June 2021: Delaware State Arts Council formally adopts Cultivating Creativity: 2021-2025 and the accompanying Appendix, for implementation to begin July 1, 2021

Delaware Division of the Arts Staff

Paul Weagraff, Director
Kristin Pleasanton, Deputy Director
Leeann Wallett, Marketing/Communications

Delaware State Arts Council

Tina Betz, Director – Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs, City of Wilmington
David Fleming – Community Leader
Rosetta Roach – Visual Arts Educator (Retired), Capital School District

Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement Staff

Sheila Bravo, President & CEO
Stephanie Sullivan, Research Assistant

Strategic Consulting and Advising

Diedra Montgomery

Community Participants                                      

We are grateful to the more than 400 individuals who willingly and generously gave of their time and expertise by participating in interviews, focus groups, and town hall meetings. Their contributions have been invaluable in informing this plan.

APPENDIX AND FURTHER INFORMATION                            

The findings that informed the creation of Cultivating Creativity: 2021-2025 were compiled from a series of individual interviews, focus groups, virtual town hall meetings, online surveys, and email comments. Details of the public input process and findings can be found in the strategic plan’s appendix on the Division website at: https://artsfiles.delaware.gov/DDOA_2021-2025_Strategic_Plan_Appendix.pdf.

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  • Scene Stealers – a bi-weekly digest of DelawareScene arts and cultural events across Delaware
  • Mezzanine Gallery – Your invitation to monthly exhibitions at the Mezzanine Gallery, 820 North French Street, Wilmington

Go to arts.delaware.gov and click “Join Our Mailing List” to sign up for mailings.

VISIT OUR ARTS & CULTURE CALENDAR

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www.youtube.com/user/DelawareArts

 CONTACT US

Delaware Division of the Arts
Carvel State Office Building
820 North French Street, 4th floor
Wilmington DE 19801
delarts@delaware.gov; 302-577-8278

Satellite Office (by appointment only)

21 The Green
Dover DE 19901

Cultivating Creativity: 2021-2025 Appendix

The work on the Delaware Division of the Arts 2021–2025 Strategic Plan began in September 2020, six months after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Arts organizations and artists were greatly impacted by mandated health and safety guidelines; and in Delaware (as elsewhere) there were heightened concerns centered on racial equity and social justice. Recognizing the significance of the moment, the Division chose to incorporate broad and diverse input on our work, seeking to understand the state of the state’s arts organizations, artists, arts educators, and the art economy. An in-depth process consisting of 30 individual interviews, ten focus groups, three virtual town halls, four online surveys, and myriad email comments allowed over 400 individuals to provide the insights that created this plan. All work was conducted using social distancing measures, and input included both those who had received Division grants and those who engage with the arts but had no prior experience with the Division.

Participants shared how they value the arts, recognizing it as a vital component of a thriving economy, with awareness that the arts provide job skills; bring people together; and create physical, spiritual, and emotional wellness. Results indicated satisfaction with the Division’s grantmaking and programs, and the staff received high marks for responsiveness and communication skills. However, there was a perception that the Division concentrates its grantmaking in more traditional art forms, and many individuals called for an expanded funding strategy embracing non-traditional art forms that engage with more racially and culturally diverse artists.

COVID-19 has had a dramatic and adverse effect on the creative sector. According to Brookings Institution estimates, over one-third of Delaware’s creative jobs were lost in the first three months of the pandemic. Arts organizations participating in the survey estimated a 57% drop in 2020 audiences. The arts are a critical component of the state’s economic strength, and surveys reflected how the state’s businesses, arts organizations, government, schools, and artists rely on one another. School-age youth were of great concern. Access to arts programming outside of school is sparse in certain areas of the state, and inconsistent internet access means that youth engagement in school-based arts has been curtailed. However, many Delaware arts organizations found creative ways to engage youth in their homes, ranging from the creation of community arts projects to home delivery of art supplies.

During the course of planning outreach, the Division consistently received feedback on opportunities that would improve access to the arts and to arts funding for both artists of color and art forms reflecting differing cultural heritage. Arts organizations are interested in receiving support that would enable them to diversify leadership and explore ways to improve accessibility and arts engagement with diverse audiences. In addition to funding more diverse art forms, artists would like the Division to provide support for skill-building in business practices, as well as outreach that would connect them to artist peers. There is recognition that some parts of Delaware do not have ready access to local arts venues, and respondents indicated a desire for the Division to explore state-wide opportunities to benefit these regions. Finally, there is a desire to see an increase in funding through possible government and private sector partnerships that would boost investment in the arts.

Based on these findings, staff and a designated working group revised the Division’s Mission, Vision, and Values, identifying desired outcomes and strategies for 2021-2025. In partnership with other government agencies and the Delaware Arts Alliance, over the next four years the Division will seek to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Quality arts experiences for all
  • A healthy arts ecosystem where artists are supported and connected, and arts organizations are financially sustainable
  • Artists, arts organization staff, and arts programming reflect the diversity of our communities
  • Division grants and services are recognized statewide by all, particularly by artists, organizations, and community leaders

This strategic plan presents outcomes and strategies that will guide the Division in its grants, programs, and services over a four-year period. The Division intentionally developed a streamlined framework that can endure economic and political fluctuations, with the intent of constructing annual goal-oriented operational plans and performance indicators that align with the strategic plan and respond to current conditions. Those operational plans will be available on the Division’s website at https://arts.delaware.gov/strategic-plan.

The Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement (DANA) was contracted to conduct research and facilitate plan development. The Delaware State Arts Council (DSAC) provided guidance on the Division’s revised Mission, Vision, and Value statements and reviewed the final plan (March 2021) after public comments were gathered. Throughout the process, a working group of Division staff and representatives from the Council was led by facilitator Sheila Bravo from DANA and Deidra Montgomery, an independent arts consultant specialist in diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Community input was gathered via multiple channels, with intentional outreach to communities and artists that have not previously engaged with the Division. Over 400 individuals provided feedback to the Division in a process that consisted of:

  • September & October 2020: Thirty 45-minute interviews engaging representatives of business; government; philanthropy; nonprofit and for-profit arts and social organizations; patrons; donors; artists; and arts educators across the state.
  • October 2020: Ten virtual focus groups via Zoom, each representing a different constituency across all three Delaware counties. They included practicing artists; both volunteer and professionally staffed nonprofit arts organizations; non-arts community-based organizations that provide arts programming; school-based educators; and patrons and donors.
  • November 2020: Three 90-minute virtual town halls—open public forums—to elicit feedback from a wide range of Delaware citizens.
  • December 2020: Four online surveys seeking input from artists, arts educators, business leaders, and leaders from nonprofit institutions (arts and others).
  • January 2021: Two-week public comment period soliciting general input on a draft plan for final reviewing and editing.
  • March 2021: Delaware State Arts Council approves draft strategic plan and recommends copy editing and creation of complementary appendix providing background information
  • June 2021: Delaware State Arts Council formally adopts Cultivating Creativity: 2021-2025 and the accompanying Appendix, for implementation to begin July 1, 2021

Each of these investigations were summarized into reports for the Division to help inform the plan development.  This report provides some highlights of the insights gained from the community input and which shaped the Division’s 2021–2025 strategic plan.

The Division receives its funding primarily from two sources: The National Endowment for the Arts and state appropriations by the legislature.  In FY 2020 the Division received $4.57 million, a 9% increase over the prior fiscal year. On average, the Division spends more than 80% of its budget on grantmaking and special programs.

According to the National Assembly of State Art Agencies (2020), the Division applied 84% of its grants to arts organizations in FY19, with the balance to artists, community organizations, and arts education.  Its peer state agencies across the country allocate 76% to arts organizations.  The Division also grants a greater percentage of its awards towards performing and visual arts (60%) than its peers (49%). It grants 34% to multi-disciplinary art, which is comparable to its peers, but the Division grants considerably less allocation to other art forms at 7% vs its peer agency allocation at 17%.  Feedback from artists, particularly those who identify as non-white, expressed concerns with the Division’s historical allocation to more traditional art forms.  Representatives from culturally diverse communities indicate they do not receive Division funding.

Overall, artists, arts educators, and arts organizations express high satisfaction with ways to engage with the Division.  The staff receive high marks for their helpfulness and responsiveness.  There is great appreciation for the Division’s communication – particularly in the early months of the pandemic.  Some are not as satisfied with the Division’s grantmaking levels.

Individuals who identified as non-white provided lower ratings for the Division on all measures.  Nationally, the Division is recognized for its investment to promote and advance the arts through vehicles such as the DelawareScene newsletter and the podcast.

The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis reports that arts and cultural production accounts for $1,029,174,693 and 1.5% of the Delaware economy, contributing 8,824 jobs (NASAA, Creative Economy State Profiles, 2017).  A 2017 study conducted by the American for the Arts show Delaware arts patrons spend an additional $46 million in food, lodging, transport, and shopping when engaging with the arts.

And their spending, along with the arts organizations’ own expenditures generate $10.4 million in local and state tax revenue.

This ecosystem of government, businesses, artists, and arts organizations relies on each investing with the other.  The surveys conducted by the Division in 2020 revealed the linkages and how much these different entities rely on each other for mutual benefit.

Unfortunately, the arts industry was one of the hardest hit by the pandemic, with over 36% job loss nationally from February 2020 (John Hopkins Center for Civil Studies, February 16, 2021). The Brookings Institute (December 2020) estimates that 33% of jobs within the Delaware art industry were lost between April and July 2020, and an additional 29% of Delaware persons in creative occupations lost their jobs.  The federal government provided additional grant funding for arts and cultural institutions, which the Division distributed.  In 2020, the Division provided additional grants to artists and arts organizations to help sustain them through the pandemic.

Schools play an important role in exposing youth to arts organizations.  They also provide community events.  The variability in how schools provided arts education experiences has resulted in a year where school-age children had inconsistent exposure to art experiences, if at all.  Many arts organizations stepped in to provide school-age youth access to art supplies for their homes to provide some opportunity for creative expression.  Most individuals who participated in the Division survey do not believe the schools are providing robust art experiences.  The Division, in partnership with the Department of Education, is conducting a study to better understand student art experiences in each school district.

A silver lining during 2020 was that several artists and arts organization found creative ways to engage their audiences, through drive-in art events, online concerts, and even community art production, where art was created at home and presented in a central town location.  The pandemic also revealed inequities in access to the arts for youth living in communities where internet connectivity was not possible.  Artists who had previously only presented their work in physical locations found they were at a disadvantage from those who had previously embraced digital promotion. These artists were not set up to run their business from the internet, and thus experienced greater impact.

The arts are recognized as a means through which individuals can work through trauma, express themselves, decompress, and find healing.  As the pandemic draws on, many who participated in this strategic planning process indicated that arts experiences will be a fundamental element in community and personal recovery from the stress and trauma of the pandemic and its related impacts. At the writing of this report, vaccine rollouts are commencing, bringing a sense of hope that communities may engage in a greater way in arts experiences in 2021.

In the interviews, focus groups, and town hall sessions, participants shared their support and value for the arts. The arts provide personal pleasure and physical and mental health. The arts connect us with each other, helping us to communicate complex and difficult subjects in different ways.  The arts remove barriers, creating conversations and understanding among diverse individuals.

The arts provide jobs: jobs for artists, art-related jobs such as lighting and marketing, and jobs in local businesses that benefit from the patrons that attend arts events and festivals.  The arts are woven into people’s cultural history, and youth experience the arts as they learn about their culture.  The survey further supported this; and it also identified opportunities to encourage business and schools to engage more in the arts.

Artist Insights:

Artists have found the pandemic to be isolating, and it has reduced access to audiences greatly.  However, for some it also has been an opportunity to explore their art in new ways.  Artists expressed ways in which the Division could support their efforts:

  • Provide more training and technical support and the many forms it can take from mentoring to how to run a business.
  • Connect artists where they can collaborate, provide peer input and critiques, and have social interactions and peer sharing.
  • Develop and promote spaces where artists can present and connect with other artists and audiences.
  • Expand the Division’s grantmaking to diverse art forms, supporting artists of color, and supporting art in technology.
  • Simplify or change the grant application process so it is more accessible.
  • Advocate for arts in education and promote opportunities for arts education outside of school.

Arts Organization Leader Insights:

Arts organizations have had significant audience and revenue loss in 2020 – those who responded to the survey indicated 43% reduction in audiences.  In the patron survey, 65% of patrons said they attended more than six art events in 2019, while in 2020 85% said they attended six or less art events. Opportunities for the Division to strengthen arts organizations include:

  • Advocate for public/private partnerships and other investment tools to strengthen the arts in Delaware.
  • Invest in resources to help nonprofits advance diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts in their audiences, programming, staffing, and boards.
  • Advocate to improve arts education in schools.
  • Consider evolving grantmaking allocations from being equal (i.e., formula based) to more equitable, supporting innovative art initiatives.

Insights from Organizations/Groups that Engage with Arts but not with the Division:

The Division sought input from individuals and community leaders who had not previously engaged with it, but who are known to have vibrant and diverse artistic traditions.  Their feedback included:

  • Art is imbedded in many cultures and is frequently the basis for cultural heritage days and celebrations. Often, these cultural heritage days and celebrations are isolated from the general population, even though they are an opportunity for cross-cultural promotion, shared art programming, and recognition of culturally-based art forms.
  • Multi-disciplinary art and contemporary art forms don’t seem to “fit” into the Division’s grantmaking model, yet nationally are top art forms (e.g., hip hop). Consider allocating more funding to non-traditional art.
  • Art is considered a valued method for addressing mental and physical health – community-based organizations bring art into their health and social service programs and continue to expand their investment in it.

Insights from Patrons and Donors:

Patrons and donors value the arts and invest in the arts for many reasons. For some, it is because they or a family member are engaged with the arts.  For others, they see it as supporting their community as arts programs benefit the local economy.  Most donors shared that they gave the same or more to the arts in 2020 over 2019.  Considerations for the Division’s plan that emerged:

  • Creating a pipeline of the next generation of workers either in the creative industry or who have creative occupations. Companies have positions that require artistic skills, yet over a third surveyed did not think the K-12 or higher education schools prepare students for jobs with the necessary artistic/creative skills.
  • When asked about a future vision, the majority desired to see greater investment across the state in the arts by both private and public interests, greater inclusion and diversity in the arts, and to see Delaware recognized as an arts destination for its rich cultural heritage.

The Division wished to understand how persons access and engage with the arts, the strategies arts organizations employ, and what barriers exist for minority populations to access the arts.  There is consensus that racially and culturally diverse persons and art forms tend to be siloed from many of the arts organizations in Delaware.

The Division gathered artists representing relative diversity in age, gender, location, discipline, and relationship to the arts to share their perspective. They talked in terms of who and what is missing from Division support and arts supports in Delaware more broadly.

There were several reasons raised. One is the perception by these individuals that the organizations do not offer programming that appeals to them or that they are not welcome.  Another reason mentioned is that they have not thought about engaging with the arts organizations. This could be because they did not experience this form of art in the past or culturally have not thought to engage.  On the other hand, the arts organizations recognize their audiences are not diverse. Their boards and leadership are not diverse. Some do have outreach programs trying to offer programs where those audiences exist, but there is an awareness they could do more.  Other barriers are structural, such as admission fees, and locations where art takes place.  Arts organizations desire to reach out to communities, but it requires knowledge, resources and thus funding.  Non-arts organizations and community leaders would like more youth access and engagement with the arts.

Across all four surveys there were common perspectives about the value of the arts, who is missing in art experiences, and a desired emphasis for Division programs and services.  There was an interest in seeing improvement in the following ways:

  • Inclusion and welcoming of more persons of color.
  • Access to the arts for those in socio-economically disadvantaged communities
  • Arts outreach for people experiencing homelessness, those who have experienced domestic violence, LBGTQ+
  • More engagement with young adults
  • Recognition of diverse art forms, new art forms
  • Engaging with and including cultural art forms (Hispanic, Native American, etc.)
  • Accessibility of art performances spaces

Mission

The Delaware Division of the Arts is a state agency committed to supporting the arts and cultivating creativity to enhance the quality of life in Delaware.

Vision

We envision a future when every person and community in Delaware has access to, and appreciation for, the diversity, richness, and transformative power of the arts.

Core Values

  • Artistic Merit: demonstrate quality and impact of the arts.
    • Synthesizing aesthetics, technical skill, and ability for effective delivery of artistic product, process, and/or service
    • Exhibiting a positive impact on community, education, health, and wellbeing
    • Supporting educational excellence in and through the arts

 

  • Diversity: recognize and include the many dimensions of human identity and difference
    • Acknowledging and serving traditional, emerging, and evolving art forms
    • Valuing and serving all individuals and communities in celebration of the cultural and demographic diversity of the state

 

  • Equity: identify and eliminate barriers to participation in the arts through policy and practice
    • Facilitating equitable access to participation in the arts
    • Ensuring that all people realize fair and just engagement, treatment, benefits, and opportunities for participation in the arts

 

  • Inclusion: engage a diversity of individuals, communities, and perspectives to ensure equal access, representation, and belonging
    • Assuring that all Delawareans can participate in, and benefit from, the arts
    • Responding to individual and community needs in a changing environment
    • Connecting individuals, communities, and resources through the arts

 

  • Innovation: support new methods, ideas, and practices in artistic creation, programming, governance, and management
    • Ensuring fulfillment of unmet needs in the community through the arts
    • Celebrating unique and emerging forms of artistic expression
    • Fostering and supporting sustainable fiscal and operational models and practices as responsible stewards of available resources

Sussex                                     45-64 years

Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin (Mexican, Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, Dominican, Colombian, etc.)

Adult Artists (Professional, Lifelong Learners, Amateur, Emerging)

Thanks so much for your excellent service to the arts and creatives

Sussex                                     45-64 years

White (German, Irish, Italian, Polish, French, etc.)

Youth (K-12, Higher Ed, Art Educators in- and out-of-school, Government & Administration)

I think this is a phenomenal organization, and I appreciate its support of the Poetry Out Loud program. The coaches, instructors, and coordinators do all they can to enrich the art of poetic performance to students up and down the state of Delaware. I am grateful for their efforts!

New Castle                             65 years and over

White (German, Irish, Italian, Polish, French, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

Your plan seems very comprehensive. Congratulations on developing a good ongoing plan.  However, I think that the coming year will still be a most difficult one for the arts community. Many of our audience members are over 65 years old. Will they be willing to come to programs where they do not know if the people attending have been vaccinated or not? I believe that the way we present art forms will of necessity change in the future. I would hope that the Arts Council will offer workshops on new ways to reach arts audiences. The DDOA has been generous with their grants this year, equalling what was given in the past year. I feel certain that the Delaware Arts organizations will continue to need added support for the coming year as well. We need help from the DDOA with teaching us ways to reach out to different and more diverse audiences.

Sussex                                     65 years and over

White (German, Irish, Italian, Polish, French, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

The plan is sound and I congratulate everyone involved.  Well done all!

I would like to be more involved in DD of the Arts.  I have founded the acting group at CAMP Rehoboth in Rehoboth Beach and work closely with Leslie Sinclair.  Will plan provide more funding for LGBTQ themed theatre performances?

Kent                                        65 years and over

Asian (Chinese, Filipino, Asian Indian, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

The strategic plan is pretty thorough addressing the needs of different sectors in the community from artists to arts organizations and patrons and donors. I consider them one of the most difficult task for DDOA is in providing education and access to community members who are least able to afford the expense of exposure and education in the arts. There should be more support for arts-integrated programs in our educational system and communities.

What is the ‘next’ step?

Kent                                        65 years and over

Black or African American (African America, Jamaican, Haitian, Nigerian, Ethiopian, Somalian, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

I just want something to be implemented for children

New Castle                             45-64 years

Black or African American (African America, Jamaican, Haitian, Nigerian, Ethiopian, Somalian, etc.)

Adult Artists (Professional, Lifelong Learners, Amateur, Emerging)

This strategic plan is on point with the current needs of our communities moving forward.

New Castle                             21-44 years

Asian (Chinese, Filipino, Asian Indian, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, etc.)

Community (Donors, Patrons & Arts Appreciators, non-arts Business & Organizations)

Comment: I hope that the final plan will be “designed” by a graphic designer. This plan is much more dense (text heavy) than I had envisioned  and it would be better suited to something more visual given that it will be published by the Division of the Arts.

Comment: Some of the content can be distilled and put in an Appendix (plan development, some of the more complex data, etc.). Or made into graphs or charts with asterisks that then point to the Appendix where the accompanying text can reside.

Comment: There’s no consistency in referencing data/statistics – were you planning to use AP Style, APA or MLA or something else?

Comment: I would recommend having an editor that has experience in APA or AP style go over this. The grammar and structure of this plan can be vastly improved by an editor. There are some poorly written sentences (see examples below) and others that could be more concisely written to be more clear to the reader.

e.g. “These ninety-minute sessions were scheduled at different times throughout the week to encourage participation, and they were promoted through the DDOA mailing list, newsletter, and website as well as.”

e.g. “The federal government provided additional grant funding for arts and cultural institutions, which the Division of the Arts distributed. In 2020, the Division provided additional grants to artists and arts organizations to help sustain them through the pandemic.”

Comment: Misspellings and grammatical errors on page 10 – “Arta” and “Percpetion” and “could take years for recovery [TO RECOVER].”

Remove capitalization for “Social Media” and finish sentence “more funding being directed…”

Also need to consistently use or not use a period after each bullet point.

What are “DE Art Scene” programs…Is this DelawareScene.com or something else?

Comment: Nice job on page 11! I really like the Core Values

New Castle                             45-64 years

White (German, Irish, Italian, Polish, French, etc.)

Adult Artists (Professional, Lifelong Learners, Amateur, Emerging)

The plan looks very thorough and comprehensive.

New Castle                             65 years and over

White (German, Irish, Italian, Polish, French, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

I would like to provide some ideas on how to get increased value from the allocation of resources by the Delaware Division of the Arts. I believe that when funding is strategically invested you can achieve greater diversity, equity, and outreach.

As the pandemic begins to subside many people have been asked, “what have you missed doing the most?”. The overwhelming answer is…. listening to live music. I feel that as we “return to normal” the demand for live music will be overwhelming. Music represents a quality arts experience for people of all ages.

Music provides a simple and cost-effective method to reach a huge number of people. A grant from The Delaware Division of the Arts can be compounded by music organizations. I have attended music festivals where a grant serves as a value-added mechanism. Typically, music festivals provide a venue for many other forms of artistic creativity (such as arts and crafts that can be purchased). Artists, art staff, and art programming reflect the diversity of the communities in which they live and present.

I would like to propose that the Delaware Division of the Arts provide a generous number of resources for Musicians, Local Community Events, and Music Festivals. Increased funding for musical venues will have a positive impact on our community.  I have attended Delaware music festivals and have found the funding impact is profound. The Division’s grants and services are recognized statewide by all, particularly artists, organizations, and community leaders. Music concerts such as Bluegrass, Irish Celtic, Acoustic Blues, Native American folk, Jazz, and the African drum band Sankofa present a great musical diversity.  The youth experience is one that is remembered for a lifetime.

Musical events such as The Delmarva Folk Festival, The June Jam, the Clifford Brown Jazz Festival, The Central Delaware Blues Society’s’ blues jams, and the Wilmington Winter Bluegrass Festival, as well as many others provide a conduit for local artists. The shows held at the Old State House Delaware are supported by The Delaware Friends of Folk and are free to the public. The events also help aspiring musicians to improve their skills.

I urge the members of the Delaware Division of the Art to strongly consider taking advantage of this rare opportunity. Funding music is truly a win-win situation. A healthy art ecosystem exists where artists are supported and connected, and arts organizations are financially sustainable.

NOTE: Kim L. Zeller is a board member of the Delaware Friend of Folk Organization. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this letter represent my thoughts alone and not that of the organization.

New Castle                             45-64 years

Middle Eastern or North African (Lebanese, Iranian, Egyptian, Syrian, Morroccan, Algerian, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

The criteria for 2021-2025 should also have a valuation placed on which organizations continued to and went beyond the benchmarks on inclusion, relevancy, and creativity.  For instance, several groups in Wilmington went beyond what was even imaginable..the Delaware Art Museum, Delaware Shakespeare Theatre, and Wilmington Ballet.  I would hope that for 2022 those groups and others like them, are rewarded with higher grants, while other groups did not make the extra effort during the pandemic and simply were waiting for the next DDOA grant cycle.  The pandemic absolutely highlighted which organizations have their priorities in the right place with diversity, access, and community involvement.  Please consider having a criteria which will examine what organizations did or did not do during the pandemic cycle of 2020-2021.

If two organizations have received approximately equal grants in the past, but one organization continued to be creative, embrace diversity while the other similar organization didn’t, how will that be judged regarding grant in 2022? Is this a consideration?

Kent                                        21-44 years

Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin (Mexican, Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, Dominican, Colombian, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

Artwork that focuses on disabilities

New Castle                             65 years and over

White (German, Irish, Italian, Polish, French, etc.)

Youth (K-12, Higher Ed, Art Educators in- and out-of-school, Government & Administration)

The proposed strategic plan shows thoughtful consideration of the concerns uncovered by the broad survey process. It includes specific and actionable ways to address the concerns, using equity, inclusion and diversity as guides across the spectrum of the entire Delaware community. The plan allows for change, and looks to the future of the arts as integral to the quality of life in our state. I am excited, particularly, to see room for the inclusion of a wider interpretation of arts, artists, and media.

New Castle                             21-44 years

Black or African American (African America, Jamaican, Haitian, Nigerian, Ethiopian, Somalian, etc.)

Adult Artists (Professional, Lifelong Learners, Amateur, Emerging)

Thank you for making a concerted effort in these strange times to reach out to communities across the state and outside of your sphere of influence. The plan points towards and lays out corrections to ways communities not part of the “traditional arts” funding world have been marginalized. I applaud this. I challenge the Division to mention explicitly under “ Artists, art staff, and art programming reflects the diverse community in which they live and present” and “ The Division’s grants and services are recognized statewide by all, particularly artists, organizations, and community leaders” to list the reimagining of the artist fellowship program into a more inclusive form as part of the “Strategies to achieve” these goals. The inclusion of actors, artist from the hip hop cultural ecosystem, and other multi-disciplinary artist into the fellowships language and cycle would be a step towards welcoming more diversity into the Divisions supported artist. This move could put the Division ahead of its peers in reimagining what state fellowship programs look like and how they can inclusively support diverse communities across a state.

New Castle                             45-64 years

White (German, Irish, Italian, Polish, French, etc.)

Arts & Community Based Organizations (Professionally Staffed and Volunteer)

I have two comments:

1) Diversify the pool of recipients is an admirable goal, but it should not be a zero sum game, so that new grantees and new grantees are added at the loss of existing effective organizations. Further, in making funding decisions, DDOA should consider the degree of impact of its grant allocations. Assisting small niche groups may reach new audiences, but established groups can have much broader reach in the community overall.

2) The strategy of encouraging greater investment from other sources is essential. The state cannot carry the weight alone; counties and municipalities must be persuaded to support their own cultural infrastructure. The same is true of corporations and small business. This will become an even greater challenge as other entities switch their funding to other priorities.

Delaware Division of the Arts Staff

Paul Weagraff, Director
Kristin Pleasanton, Deputy Director
Leeann Wallett, Marketing/Communications

Delaware State Arts Council

Tina Betz, Director – Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs, City of Wilmington
David Fleming – Community Leader
Rosetta Roach – Visual Arts Educator (Retired), Capital School District

Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement Staff

Sheila Bravo, President & CEO
Stephanie Sullivan, Research Assistant

Strategic Consulting and Advising

Diedra Montgomery

Delaware Division of the Arts’ Director, Paul Weagraff, and Deputy Director, Kristin Pleasanton, in consultation with DANA, identified and invited participants to be interviewed.  DANA and arts consultant Deidra Montgomery conducted the interviews and analyzed the results.

We are very grateful to the 30 individuals who willingly gave their time and expertise by participating in interviews.   Thanks  to:  Kelly Barsdate, Chief Program and Planning Officer, National Association of State Arts Agencies;  Jennifer Boland, Delaware Technical Community College;  Natosha Carmine, Chief, The Nanticoke Indian Tribe;  Nnamdi Chukwuocha, Poet Laureate/State Representative;  Stuart Comstock-Gay, Delaware Community Foundation;  Rosemary Connelly, visual artist, Mispillion Art League;  Lauren Conrad, Department of Education;  Mike DiPaolo, Delaware Community Foundation;  Fostina Dixon, jazz musician;  Sara Ganter, Executive Director, Rehoboth Art League;  Rich Garrett, Children’s Beach House;  Patti Grimes, Freeman Foundation;  Ryan Grover, Biggs Museum;  Jennifer Gunther, Art Works for All;  Chanda Jackson,  National Council on Agricultural Life and Labor (NCALL), Restoring Central Dover;  Raye Avery Jones, formerly with Christina Cultural Arts Center;  Kristopher Knight, Department of State;  Diane Laird, Downtown Dover;  Lynette Overby, Delaware Dance Educators Association;  Hal Real, World Café Live;  Laura Semmelroth, Wilmington Alliance;  Brian Shupe, State Representative;  Kelli Steele, Delaware Public Media;  Javier Torrijos, Delaware Hispanic Commission

We are very grateful to the individuals who willingly gave their time and expertise by participating in focus groups.   Thanks  to:  Carlos Alejandro, commercial photographer;  JoAnn Balingit, teaching artist, poet;  Jennifer Barker, composer, pianist;  Christopher Braddock, guitarist;  Paul Cullen, performing artist;  Joe del Tufo, photographer;  Fostina Dixon, jazz musician;  Joan Fabbri, water colorist;  Don Foster, literary artist;  Chris Fullman, audio production;  James Gibson, musician;  D. Marque Hall, visual artist;  Arreon Harley-Emerson, Choir School of Delaware;  Ginny Jewell, literary artist;  Michael Kalmbach, Creative Vision Factory;  Ebert Kari Ann, poet;  Dennis Lawson, literary artist;  Scott Mason, performing artist;  Nina Mickelson, visual artist;  Mike Miller, folk musician;  Al Mills, Poet Laureate;  Gail O’Donnell, critical writer;  Richard Raw, hip-hop artist;  Zoe Scruggs, painter, musician;  Nick Serratore, visual artist;  Mark Taneyhill, literary artist;  Jonathan Whitney, jazz drummer;  Christian Wills, teaching artist;  Michele Xiques, dance instructor/choreographer; Jessica Ball, Delaware Arts Alliance; Dave Bart, Jerry’s Artarama; Mary Kate Benson, Boys and Girls Club; Mary Liz Biddle, PNC Bank; April Birmingham, community relations, M&T Bank; Suzanne L. Burton, Associate Dean, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Delaware; Theresa Colvin, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation; Brendan Cooke, Opera Delaware; Sharon Crossen, The Children’s Theatre ; Christina Darby, Nanticoke River Arts Council; Mike DiPaolo, Delaware Community Foundation; Susan Early, Rehoboth Beach Film Society; Annalisa Ekbladh, Autism Delaware; Terry Foreman, Newark Arts Alliance; Morgan Galloday, Mispillion Art League; Molly Giordano, Delaware Art Museum; Kristen Gramer, Lewes Public Library; Chris Grundner, Welfare Foundation; Debbie Hansen, Delaware Department of Education (retired); Kathleen Hawkins, CENDEL Foundation; Nanci Hersh, Delaware Institute for Arts in Education; Patty Hoffman, Laffey McHugh Foundation; Kathryn Jakabcin, Arts at Trinity; Janis Julian, The Historic Odessa Foundation; Liz Keller, Division of Small Business/Tourism; Katherine McFadden, Delaware Choral Society; Alex Older, Easter Seals Delaware; Ellen Priest, Eyeball It!® and Boys and Girls Clubs; James Ray Rhodes, Christina Cultural Arts Center; Kristen Rosenthal, Delaware Art Education Association; Laura Semmelroth, Wilmington Alliance; Stuart Sherman, Boys and Girls Club; Leslie Sinclair, Camp Rehoboth; David Stradley, Delaware Shakespeare; Kathrina Stroud, Inner City Cultural League; Ronaldo Tello, Del Hispano Magazine, Hispanic American Association of Delaware; Todd Veale, Laffey McHugh Foundation; Charlie Vincent, Spur Impact

We are very grateful to the individuals who willingly gave their time and expertise by participating in town halls.   Thanks  to:  Denise Adkins, Southern Delaware Chorale;  Sharon Baker, Serviam Media, Inc. / Hearts & Minds Film;  Jessica Ball, Delaware Arts Alliance, Inc.;  Lisa Bartoli, Art Therapy Express Program, Inc.;  Kori Beaman, Beautiful Gate Outreach Center;  Adrienne Brendlinger, Delaware Art Education Association;  Suzanne Burton, University of Delaware;  Warren Campbell, Chesapeake Silver Cornet Brass Band;  Jean Cantrell, Signify;  Natosha Carmine, The Nanticoke Indian Tribe;  Lori Citro, 3QueensMusic;  Sharon Crossen, The Children’s Theatre;  Mark Fields, The Grand Opera House;  Dwight Fowler, Milford Community Band;  Sonja Frey, Mispillion Art League;  JuneRose Futcher, Teaching Artists of the Mid-Atlantic;  Maria Gonzalez, Drama Kids;  Ryan Grover, Biggs Museum Of American Art;  Jordyn Gum, Nantico;  D. Marque Hall, Fineblackart.com;  Arreon Harley-Emerson, The Choir School of Delaware;  Pete Harrigan, Delaware Arts Alliance, Inc.;  V Hayes, Retired;  Robert James, Artist;  Kristina Kambalov, First State Ballet Theatre, Inc.;  Shelley Koon, 68 Huntley Multimedia;  Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Arts in Media LLC;  Cassandra Lewis Slattery, Bastille Arts;  Lianna Magerr, Wilmington Children’s Chorus;  Pamelyn Manocchio, The Grand Opera House;  Amanda McGinty, Resident Ensemble Players;  Michael Miller, Delaware Friends of Folk;  Tyniece Norwood, Friends of Nanticoke Indian Tribe;  Lorraine Poling, Delaware Art Education Association;  Ellen Priest, Eyeball It!® and Boys and Girls Clubs;  Adira Riben, Artist;  Sanford Robbins, Resident Ensemble Players;  Richard Scalenghe, Coastal Concerts;  Nicole Sexton, New Castle County Art Studio;  Greg Shelnutt, Department of Art & Design, University of Delaware;  Vanesa Simon, Mariposa Arts;  Tamara Smith, Delaware Dance Company;  Samantha Tan, Delaware Arts Alliance, Inc.;  Emily Tepe, IVA Voice and Music LLC;  Mack Wathen, Delaware State Arts Council;  Stephanie Whitcomb, Clear Space Theatre Company;  Dana Wise, Delaware Division of the Arts;  Ronney Wright, Nanticoke Indian Association


Previous Strategic Plans

Delaware Design 2.0 logo
Design Delaware 2.0 was the Delaware Division of the Arts’ strategic plan for FY2016-FY2020. With input from more than 900 participants statewide, this plan represented the goals and aspirations of the people we serve at the time. View the Design Delaware 2.0 plan. This plan, with Council approval, was extended to FY2021 in order to align new strategic plans with Delaware’s four-year gubernatorial cycles.

Operational Plans

Design Delaware 2.0 was developed as a streamlined strategic plan that can endure economic and political variability, with the intent of constructing annual goal-oriented operational plans with performance indicators that align with the strategic plan and respond to current conditions.
FY2016 Operational Plan
FY2017 Operational Plan
FY2018 Operational Plan


 

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